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2014


Schnitzelbank Red Cabbage

From: Adele 
Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2014 5:46 PM
To: phaedrus@hungrybrowser.com 
Subject: Recipe

Hi and Happy New Year
Some years ago the Grand Rapids Press (MI) carried some recipes from the Schnitzelbank restaurant
I would like them all - but especially the sweet and sour red cabbage. I think there were four all 
together but I don't remember what the other ones were.  

Thanks
Adele

Hi Adele,

At the time Schnitzelbank closed, several of their recipes were printed in the Grand Rapids Press and also were posted on the Press’s website. See: Roadfood

However, the Press has taken the recipes down from their site, and none of the links given on Roadfood lead to a recipe now. Searching the Grand Rapids Press site archives was of no avail. I did manage to find the red cabbage recipe from the Jasper, Indiana restaurant (not Grand Rapids, MI) at: Explore Southern Indiana
It’s posted below. Their Bavarian meat loaf recipe is also at that site.

Adele, my practice is to do one recipe per request, so I won’t go and find every Schnitzelbank recipe that I can possibly find and send them to you. Schnitzelbank (Jasper, Indiana restaurant) published a cookbook of their recipes, which you can buy. It has 72 pages of their recipes. Schnitzelbank Restaurant If you get no response from that link when you try to order the cookbook, there is a used one for sale on Amazon.com, and there might also be one for sale on Ebay. If you request Schnitzelbank recipes from me one at a time by the name of the recipe, then I will be happy to search them out for you – just not all available Schnitzelbank recipes all at once.

Note that I had no success finding any recipes from the Grand Rapids, MI restaurant. I only found recipes from the Jasper, Indiana restaurant with that name, and the two restaurants do not appear to be connected other than sharing the same name.

Phaed

Schnitz (Jasper, Indiana restaurant) Red Cabbage (Rothkohl)

1 medium to large red cabbage
2 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. lard or vegetable oil
2 medium cooking apples, peeled and cored- cut into 1/8" wedges
1 bay leaf
2 tbsp. sugar
2/3 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup onion- chopped fine
1 small onion peeled
1 cup boiling water
4 -6 whole cloves

Directions: wash the cabbage under cold water. Remove the outer leaves and cut the head lengthwise into quarters.

Remove the core and cut each quarter crosswise into fine strips. Put the cabbage in a bowl and add the sugar, salt, 
vinegar - tossing to mix thoroughly. Heat the lard (or oil) in a large 4-6 qt sauce pan over medium heat. Add the 
chopped onion and apples, stirring frequently until the apple slices are slightly browned. (about 5 minutes) 
Add the cabbage, the bay leaf and the whole onion, pierced with the cloves. Stir the mixture well and then add 
the boiling water.

Bring the contents of the pan to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and then turn the heat down to a low simmer.

Cover and allow to simmer until the cabbage is tender- about 1.5 to 2 hours. Make sure that the cabbage remains moist.

When ready hardly any liquid should be left. If mixture looks too dry add a tablespoon full of boiling water. 
Remove the bay leaf and the whole onion. Add the red wine and stir. Serve in a heated bowl.
=============================================================
Dear Uncle Phaedrus,

Let me preface my comments by stating that I love your website and follow it religiously.

Now, to the matter at hand.  You posted recipes purported to be from the Schnitzelbank Restaurant in Grand Rapids, Michigan, 
when in fact they are from Schnitzelbank Restaurant of Jasper Indiana (Schnitzelbankgr.com refers, I believe, to Schnitzelbank 
German Restaurant, not Grand Rapids - and the phone number is not a Grand Rapids, Michigan number).

I was a huge fan of the Schnitzelbank of Grand Rapids, and I am pretty sure they did not even have bread pudding on the menu.   
And the best thing on the menu was the lamb shank - I believe the Thursday special.   

With all due respect,  to represent that the recipes from the Schnitzelbank of Jasper Indiana are the same as those of the 
Schnitzelbank of Grand Rapids is a rather large leap.  

And now some recent history on the many year chef from the Schnitzelbank.  Chef Dill and his son opened a German restaurant 
in Middleville, Michigan which had some of the original menu items - but the venture failed, likely because Middleville is 
just a little too far from Grand Rapids for Schnitzelbank's loyal following to visit in sufficient quantities to make a go of it.  
An early review of the new restaurant:  

http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2012/12/dining_out_restaurant_review_d.html

Thought you would be interested in the above.  Keep up the good work! 


Gerry 

=============================================================
Well, I didn't realize that the two restaurants were not connected. The below recipes would appear to be from the Jasper, Indiana restaurant.
=============================================================

I have a few more recipes from my files.      

Timm in Oregon


Schnitzelbank Restaurant Apple Strudel
Source: Schnitzelbank Restaurant, Jasper, Indiana

Ingredients:

1 (18.25 ounce) box yellow cake mix
1/2 cup coconut
1/2 cup butter
7 cups peeled, sliced apples
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
Raisins, to taste (optional)
1 large egg 1 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon sugar

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350F degrees. Butter a 9 x 13 inch baking pan and set aside. In a large bowl, combine cake mix, 
coconut and butter. Use a pastry mixer, knife or food processor to chop the butter into small pieces, until the mixture 
looks crumbly. Scatter mixture to cover bottom of buttered pan. In another bowl, combine apples, brown sugar, granulated sugar, 
cinnamon and as many raisins as you wish (if using). Spread over cake-mix mixture. In a small bowl, blend egg, sour cream and 
1 teaspoon sugar. Spread atop apples. Bake for 45 minutes. Mixture is done when a knife poked into the center reveals a spongy, 
cake-like texture on the bottom layer. The top will remain somewhat gooey, so a wooden pick test will not work.
-
Schnitzelbank Pot

Ingredients:

8 ounces ripe Camembert cheese
8 ounces Limburger cheese
2 ounces Roquefort cheese
4 ounces butter
1 tablespoon all purpose flour
1 cup cream
1/2 cup green olives, finely chopped
1/4 cup jarred canned pimiento, diced
1 pinch cayenne pepper

Instructions:

Remove as much or as little of the Camembert rind as prefered. Mash the Camembert, Limburger and Roquefort together with a silver 
spoon, adding the butter and flour. Place into an enamel lined pan (metal pans and non-silver spoons will turn the cheese black) 
and heat gently.

When the cheese begins to melt, add the cream and stir continuously until smooth, creamy sauce forms. Strain through a sieve 
into a tight lidded crock. Stir in the olives and pimiento thoroughly. Sprinkle cayenne over the top, close the lid, and allow 
ripening at least 3 days before serving, if not longer. Store in the refrigerator no longer than 2 weeks. Serve at room temperature; 
remove from refrigerator at least 2 hours before serving. Serve with rye or pumpernickel, or spread on crackers or celery sticks.
-
Schnitzelbank German Potato Salad

Ingredients:

3 pounds redskin potatoes
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup cider vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 cup cooked bacon, crumbled
2 teaspoons kosher salt
Black pepper, freshly ground to taste

Instructions:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the potatoes and cook until tender but still firm. Peel the potatoes as soon 
as you can handle them and cut in slices.

In a large bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, onion, oil, vinegar, parsley, bacon, salt and pepper. Gently stir in the warm potatoes. 
Let stand for 1 hour before serving to blend flavors. Chill until ready to serve.
-
Schnitzelbank Bread Pudding

Ingredients:

For the Bread Pudding:

2 cups day old bread cubes cut in 1/4 inch cubes
2 cups milk
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup white granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 teaspoon plain salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated

For the Vanilla Sauce:

1/2 cup white granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup boiling water
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Dash plain salt

Instructions:

In a sauce pan, scald the milk, butter and sugar over medium heat; let cool slightly.

In bowl, beat the eggs and blend thoroughly into the milk mixture. Add the salt, vanilla cinnamon and nutmeg; mix well.

Place the bread cubes in a large, buttered, oven proof casserole dish. Pour the milk/egg mixture over bread cubes; 
toss to coat. Set casserole dish in a pan of hot water. Bake at 350F degrees for 1 hour or until knife comes out clean.

For the Vanilla Sauce: In saucepan, combine the sugar and cornstarch; add water gradually while stirring constantly. 
Boil for 5 minutes and then remove from the heat. Add the butter, vanilla and salt; stir until the butter has melted and serve hot. 
Yield: 1 cup sauce.
-
Schnitzelbank Cucumber and Dill Salad

Ingredients: 

2 cups cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced large
1/2 cup fresh dill, finely, chopped
3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons canola oil
1/2 teaspoon white granulated sugar
Small squirt yellow mustard
Kosher salt to taste
Black pepper, freshly ground to taste to taste
4 to 5 cherry or grape tomatoes

Instructions: 

Place the cucumber and dill in a bowl. Mix the rest of the ingredients in a small jar and pour it over the salad. 
Toss to coat and let the salad marinate for at least 30 minutes. Garnish with the cherry tomatoes. Refrigerate if 
you plan to leave the salad for more than 30 minutes, but remember to remove it 15 minutes before serving, so that 
it comes to room temperature.
------------------------
I dug deeper into my recipe files and found a few more recipes.       

Timm in Oregon

 
Schnitzelbank Pork Hocks

Ingredients:

6 fresh pork hocks
Water to cover
1 medium size onion, quartered
2 bay leaves
1 tablespoon pickling spices
6 to 8 black peppercorns
Kosher salt to taste

Instructions:

Wash the pork hocks well under cold running water. Place the hocks in a large pot with enough water to cover; 
bring to a boil. Add the onion, bay leaves, pickling spices, peppercorns and salt to taste. Cover the pot; 
reduce heat to low. Simmer slowly for 3 to 4 hours or until meat is tender and begins to come away from the bone. 
The hocks should remain intact, so do not cook until meat actually falls off the bone. Drain well; 
serve with sauerkraut and mashed potatoes.
-
Schnitzelbank Potato Pancakes

Ingredients:

8 medium size russet potatoes, about 2-1/2 pounds
1 large onion
2 large eggs, separated
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
1 scant tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon white pepper, freshly ground
Canola oil for frying

Instructions:

Peel the potatoes and cover with cold water until ready to make pancakes. Grate the potatoes and onion, 
alternately, into a strainer set over a bowl to catch the juices. the onion juice will help prevent the 
potatoes from darkening. Using a wooden spoon or hands, press or squeeze out as much liquid as possible. 
Reserve all liquid and let it settle in bowl for 2 to 3 minutes.

Combine the pressed potato and onion in another bowl. Carefully pour off the watery part of reserved liquid, 
but do not discard thick starchy paste at bottom of bowl. Scrape up starchy paste and add to potato mixture. 
Add the large egg yolks, flour, salt and pepper; mix thoroughly. In separate bowl, beat egg whites with 
electric mixer until stiff and shiny peaks form. Fold into potato mixture.

Preheat the oven to 250F degrees. Set rack on a baking sheet or in a shallow pan.

In a heavy cast iron skillet, heat 1/2 inch oil. Using about 2 tablespoons batter per pancake, drop into hot 
oil and fry, turning once, until deep golden brown on both sides, about 10 minutes for each batch. Make sure 
to fry them one at a time, to allow oil to reheat before adding another. Drain on paper towels, then transfer 
to rack and keep warm in oven while frying remaining pancakes. Do not hold pancakes for more than 15 minutes 
before serving or they may become soggy. Serve with homemade applesauce or sour cream.
-
Schnitzelbank Wiener Schnitzel, Holstein

Ingredients:

1 pound veal scallops
1/3 cup all purpose flour seasoned with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Black pepper, freshly ground to taste
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1/2 cup fine dry breadcrumbs
4 tablespoons butter
4 slices lemon (if not using egg, capers and green onion)
1 large egg, fried over easy
1 jar capers, drained
1 bunch green onions, cleaned and trimmed
4 anchovy strips
 
Instructions:

Gently pound the veal scallops between two sheets of wax paper until thin. Dredge each piece in seasoned flour; 
dip in egg and then into the breadcrumbs.

In a large skillet, heat the butter over high heat; sauté the breaded veal until golden brown on both sides. 
Arrange the veal on a heated plate and garnish with fried egg on top or 20 capers, 2 fresh green onions and 
a few anchovy filets to one side.
-
Schnitzelbank Sauerbraten

Ingredients:

1/2 cup dry red wine
2 cups cold water
8 peppercorns
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 medium size onion, sliced
3 bay leaves
4 pounds bottom beef roast, trimmed
3 tablespoons lard or vegetable oil
1/2 cup onions, chopped
1/2 cup carrots, chopped
1/4 cup celery, chopped
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
2 cups reserved marinade
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup gingersnap cookies, crumbled

Instructions:

In 3 quart saucepan, combine dry red wine, 2 cups cold water, peppercorns, red wine vinegar, onion and bay leaves. 
Bring to boil; remove from heat and cool to room temperature.

Place the beef roast in a deep crock or nonreactive container and pour marinade over meat; the liquid should come 
half way up sides of roast. Cover and refrigerate for 3 days, turning roast each day.

Remove the roast from marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Strain marinade and retain the liquid; 
discard the spices and onions.

In a 5 quart roasting pan, melt the lard or heat oil over high heat. Add the meat and brown on all sides; 
transfer the meat to a platter.

Save 2 tablespoons pan drippings in roasting pan. Add the chopped onions, carrots and celery to drippings. 
Cook for 5 minutes over medium heat, until the vegetables are light brown. Add the flour and cook 5 minutes longer. 
Add 2 cups of the reserved marinade and 1/2 cup water; bring to a boil.

Place a roast back in the pan and cover; bake at 350F degrees for 2 hours.

Remove the roast to a platter and cover with foil to retain heat. Pour the liquid from the roasting pan into a saucepan 
and skim off surface fat. Add 1/2 cup crumbled gingersnap cookies and cook for 10 minutes while stirring often. 
Strain and return the liquid to saucepan. Let simmer until ready to serve.

Slice the roast into medium thick slices and arrange on platter. Serve with the sauce, with boiled potatoes, 
dumplings, noodles and red cabbage on the side.
==============================================================================================================
From: Gerry 
Sent: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 6:38 AM
To: Phaedrus 
Subject: RE: Schnitzelbank recipes
 
Uncle Phaedrus:

SUCCESS!  A very kind reporter downloaded the recipes from the Schnitzelbank for me - including a bread pudding recipe 
of which I was not aware.  I have the recipes for red cabbage, saurebraten, cucumber salad, bread pudding, potato pancakes, 
pork hocks, Holstein schnitzel, and their German potato salad...they are attached on a separate word document.  Now, hopefully, 
folks can recreate some of the most excellent German food that was served at the Grand Rapids Schnitzelbank!

Gerry 

Recipe: Schnitzelbank sauerbraten

1/2 cup dry red wine
2 cups cold water
8 peppercorns
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 medium onion, sliced
3 bay leaves
4 pounds bottom beef roast, trimmed
3 tablespoons lard or vegetable oil
1/2 cup chopped onions
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/4 cup chopped celery
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups reserved marinade
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup crumbled gingersnap cookies

PREPARATION: In 3-quart saucepan, combine dry red wine, 2 cups cold water, peppercorns, red wine vinegar, 
onion and bay leaves. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
Place beef roast in a deep crock or nonreactive container and pour marinade over meat. Liquid should come 
half way up sides of roast. Cover and refrigerate for 3 days, turning roast each day.
Remove roast from marinade; pat dry with paper towels. Strain marinade and retain the liquid. 
Discard spices and onions. In a 5-quart roasting pan, melt lard or heat oil over high heat. Add the meat 
and brown on all sides. Transfer meat to platter.
Save 2 tablespoons pan drippings in roasting pan. Add chopped onions, carrots and celery to drippings. 
Cook 5 minutes over medium heat, 
until vegetables are light brown. Add flour and cook 5 minutes longer. Add 2 cups reserved marinade and 
1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil.
Place roast back in pan and cover. Bake at 350 degrees for 2 hours.
Remove roast to platter; cover with foil to retain heat. Pour liquid from roasting pan into a saucepan and 
skim off surface fat. Add 1/2 cup crumbled gingersnap cookies and cook 10 minutes, stirring often. 
Strain and return liquid to saucepan. Let simmer until ready to serve.
Slice roast into medium thick slices and arrange on platter. Serve with the sauce, with boiled potatoes, 
dumplings, noodles and red cabbage on the side.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Nutrition information: 645 calories, 79 grams protein, 25 grams fat, 17 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber, 
201 milligrams cholesterol, 164 milligrams sodium.

Recipe: Schnitzelbank red cabbage

1 medium-to-large head red cabbage
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium cooking apples, peeled, cored and cut into 1/8-inch wedges
1 bay leaf
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2/3 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1 small onion, peeled
4-6 whole cloves
1 cup boiling water
3 tablespoons red wine

PREPARATION: Wash cabbage under cold water. Remove outer leaves and cut the head lengthwise into quarters. 
Remove core and cut each quarter crosswise into fine strips. Place cabbage in a bowl and add sugar, salt and vinegar, 
tossing to mix thoroughly.
Heat oil in a large 4- to 6-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the chopped onion and apples, stirring frequently 
until the apple slices are slightly browned (about 5 minutes). Add the cabbage mixture and bay leaf. Stud the whole 
peeled onion with cloves; add to saucepan. Stir well, then add boiling water. Bring to a boil over high heat, 
stirring occasionally. Turn heat to low. Cover and simmer until cabbage is tender, 1 1/2 to 2 hours, making sure 
cabbage remains moist. When cabbage is ready, hardly any liquid should be left in the pot (if mixture looks dry, 
add a tablespoon of boiling water).
Remove bay leaf and whole onion with cloves. Add red wine and stir. Serve in a heated bowl.
Makes 6 servings.
Nutrition information: 98 calories, 1 gram protein, 5 grams fat, 14 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber, 
0 milligrams cholesterol, 720 milligrams sodium.

Karl Heinz Staeglich's cucumber salad

2 medium cucumbers
1/2 cup diced onion
Dash of salt
Dash of white pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup vinegar
1/4 cup salad oil
1/2 cup sour cream
-- Optional --
Diced green onion tops
Chopped parsley
Dill weed
Sweet red pepper, diced
Green pepper, diced
PREPARATION: To check for bitterness of cucumber, slice off both ends. Taste to see if ends are bitter, if so, 
slice a bit more of each end until bitterness is gone. Peel and slice cucumbers into thin slices.
In a mixing bowl, add sliced cucumbers, onion, salt, white pepper, sugar, vinegar, salad oil and sour cream. 
Mix thoroughly; chill for 1 hour. Serves 4.
-- To dress up salad, add any of the optional ingredients, to your taste.
Nutrition information: 218 calories, 19 grams fat, 2 grams protein, 13 grams carbohydrate, 1 gram fiber, 
11 milligrams cholesterol, 82 milligrams sodium

	
Bread pudding
Barbara Veenerman, of Grand Rapids, asked for the bread pudding and sauce served at the Schnitzelbank Restaurant. 
Becky Matson, of Rockford, sent this recipe.

2 cups bread cubes (day-old bread cut into 1/4-inch cubes)
2 cups milk (can use half and half)
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
-- Vanilla sauce --
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup boiling water
2 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
Few grains salt

PREPARATION: Pudding: Place bread cubes in a buttered baking dish. In saucepan, scald milk, butter and sugar. 
In separate bowl, beat eggs, then add to milk mixture along with salt, vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg; mix well.
Pour mixture over bread cubes and blend together. Set baking dish in a pan of hot water. Bake at 350 degrees 
for 1 hour or until knife comes out clean. Serve with vanilla sauce.
Serves 6.
Sauce: In a saucepan mix sugar and cornstarch; add water gradually, stirring constantly. Boil for 5 minutes, 
remove from heat, add butter, vanilla and salt. Stir until butter melts. Serve hot with bread pudding.
Makes 1 cup sauce.
Nutrition information for bread pudding with sauce: 298 calories, 15 grams fat, 6 grams protein, 35 grams carbohydrate, 
0 grams fiber, 106 milligrams cholesterol, 390 milligrams sodium.

Recipe: Schnitzelbank potato pancakes

8 medium russet potatoes (about 2 1/2 pounds)
1 large onion
2 eggs, separated
2 tablespoons flour
1 scant tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon white pepper
Canola oil for frying
PREPARATION: Peel potatoes and cover with cold water until ready to make pancakes. Grate potatoes and onion, 
alternately, into a strainer set over a bowl to catch the juices. Onion juice will help prevent the potatoes 
from darkening. Using wooden spoon or hands, press or squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Reserve all liquid 
and let it settle in bowl for 2 to 3 minutes.
Combine pressed potato and onion in another bowl. Carefully pour off watery part of reserved liquid, but do not 
discard thick starchy paste at bottom of bowl. Scrape up starchy paste and add to potato mixture.
Add egg yolks, flour, salt and pepper; mix thoroughly. In separate bowl, beat egg whites with electric mixer 
until stiff and shiny peaks form. Fold into potato mixture.
Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Set rack on baking sheet or in shallow pan.

In heavy cast iron skillet, heat 1/2-inch oil. Using about 2 tablespoons batter per pancake, drop into hot oil and fry, 
turning once, until deep golden brown on both sides, about 10 minutes for each batch.
Make sure to fry them one at a time, to allow oil to reheat before adding another. Drain on paper 
Do not hold pancakes for more than 15 minutes before serving or they may become soggy. Serve with homemade applesauce 
or sour cream.
Makes 6 servings.
Nutrition information: 328 calories, 8 grams protein, 12 grams fat, 49 grams carbohydrate, 5 grams fiber, 
98 milligrams cholesterol, 967 milligrams sodium.

Recipe: Schnitzelbank pork hocks

6 fresh pork hocks
Water, to cover
1 medium onion, quartered
2 bay leaves
1 tablespoon pickling spices
6 - 8 black peppercorns
Salt, to taste

PREPARATION: Wash pork hocks well under cold running water. Place hocks in a large pot with enough water to cover. 
Bring to a boil. Add onion, bay leaves, pickling spices, peppercorns and salt to taste. Cover pot; reduce heat to low. 
Simmer slowly for 3 to 4 hours or until meat is tender and begins to come away from the bone. The hocks should remain intact, 
so do not cook until meat actually falls off the bone. Drain well; serve with sauerkraut and mashed potatoes.
Makes 6 servings.
Nutrition information: 413 calories, 42 grams protein, 26 grams fat, 0 grams carbohydrate, 0 grams fiber, 
138 milligrams cholesterol, 449 milligrams sodium.

Schnitzelbank German potato salad

3 pounds redskin potatoes
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup cider vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup crumbled bacon
2 teaspoons salt
Pepper, to taste

PREPARATION: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add potatoes and cook until tender but still firm. 
Peel potatoes as soon as you can handle them and cut in slices.
In a large bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, onion, oil, vinegar, parsley, bacon, salt and pepper. Gently stir in potatoes. 
Let stand for 1 hour before serving to blend flavors. Chill until ready to serve.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Nutrition information: 436 calories, 6 grams protein, 26 grams fat, 48 grams carbohydrate, 4 grams fiber, 
10 milligrams cholesterol, 907 milligrams sodium.

Schnitzelbank wiener schnitzel, Holstein

1 pound veal scallops
1/3 cup flour seasoned with 1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/2 cup fine dry breadcrumbs
4 tablespoons butter
4 slices lemon (if not using egg, capers and green onion)
1 egg, fried over easy
1 jar capers, drained
1 bunch green onions, cleaned and trimmed
4 anchovy strips
PREPARATION: Gently pound veal scallops between two sheets of wax paper until thin. Dredge each piece in seasoned flour. 
Dip in egg, then into the breadcrumbs.
In a large skillet, heat the butter over high heat. Saute the breaded veal until golden brown on both sides. 
Arrange the veal on a heated plate and garnish with fried egg on top, or 20 capers, 2 fresh green onions and 
a few anchovy filets to one side.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information: 435 calories, 36 grams protein, 24 grams fat, 18 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber, 
248 milligrams cholesterol, 830 milligrams sodium.

============================================================================================
These are the recipes that were printed in the Grand Rapids Press, but they are so similar to the Jasper, Indiana Schnitzelbank recipes as to be mostly indistinguishable.


Canning Antipasto

From: betty 
Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2014 5:08 PM
To: phaedrus@hungrybrowser.com 
Subject: Antipasto

Hi Phaed 

How do I prepare and can Antipasto?

Hello Betty,

Antipasto comes in many, many varieties. Some are all vegetable, some have tuna, chicken, salmon, salami, etc, etc.

Canning meats and fish can be dangerous, so I do not pass on recipes for canning them or things that contain them. You can find several such antipasto recipes by going to Google and using these keywords: recipe canning antipasto

I will pass on a link to you for a recipe for canning vegetarian antipasto: Vegetarian Antipasto

Phaed


Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake

From: Kit  
Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2014 11:57 AM
To: phaedrus@hungrybrowser.com 
Subject: Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake

Dear Phaedrus,

My mom was married in 1939.  She used to make what she called a Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake and covered it with a simple 
confectioner sugar and milk frosting.  It was possibly a recipe from the WW-2 era.  My two brothers and I loved it.  
She died 54 years ago and I still have the 9"x9" aluminum pan she made it in.  I'd love to make that cake for my 
3 daughters but don't have the recipe.  Could you find it?  I'd be most appreciative.

Kit 

Hi Kit,

Sometimes the simple recipes are the most difficult. The things that make your request difficult are:

There are over 200 “chocolate mayonnaise cake” recipes in our files and dozens more on the Internet, but very, very few of them call for a 9 x 9 pan specifically or for such a simple frosting.

I did not find any recipe that mentioned WW-2, but I do believe that such a cake was popular during WW2 and during the depression because the mayonnaise could be used to replace the eggs usually called for in cake recipes. The Internet says that “chocolate mayonnaise cake” was created by Hellman’s mayonnaise in 1937 to create a new use for their product. The original Hellman’s recipe had nuts and other ingredients. You don’t give much description of your mom’s cake, so I don’t really know which recipes to look at.

Most “chocolate mayonnaise cake” recipes call for a cream cheese frosting or a chocolate frosting or a butter frosting or no frosting at all. I did not find any that called for just a confectioner’s sugar and milk frosting. Your mom may have used a “chocolate mayonnaise cake” recipe with no frosting and added the confectioner’s sugar and milk frosting on her own.

Without some additional detail that can be used to sort out your mom’s particular recipe from all the others, there’s not much way to proceed. Even the 9 x 9 pan may have been her own idea rather than a specific pan that was called for in the original recipe that she used.

There is a basic “chocolate mayonnaise cake” recipe below that has the simplest frosting recipe that I could find.

There are “chocolate mayonnaise cake” recipes on these pages that call for a 9 x 9 pan:

Key Ingredient

Yahoo

Bakespace

Family Cookbook Project

Phaed

Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake

2 c. flour, sifted
2 tsp. baking soda
4 tbsp. cocoa
1 c. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 c. mayonnaise
1 c. cold water
Vanilla

  Sift all dry ingredients together.  In another bowl mix cup of mayonnaise with cup of cold water.  After it dissolves, 
mix in other ingredients and add 1 teaspoon vanilla.  Bake in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes.

Frosting:
3 tbsp. Crisco
1/2 lb. powdered sugar

Add 1 teaspoon milk and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.  Beat well. 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Phaedrus,

Thanks so much for your efforts.  If I didn't know better (which I don't) I'd think you were psychic.  
As I imagine in my mind watching Mom make the cake, your best-guess recipe seems to be either the exact 
same one, or very close to it.  I'll make it and will be able to tell by the taste if its the same.  
I'll let you know.

The original recipe may have called for Miracle Whip and my mom was well aware of the early battle between 
Miracle Whip salad dressing and Hellmann's real mayonnaise, and with my dad's input she always opted for 
Hellmann's (and I'm glad she did).

Not sure about the frosting... we weren't wealthy by any means so we didn't buy much cream cheese and real 
butter was a rarity in our house.  Mom just moistened the confectioners sugar with milk to make a paste and 
sometimes added a touch of food coloring.  She added a few candles when appropriate, which I fondly remember 
was several times with my 2 brothers and myself.

Attached, which I doubt would be nearly as important to you as it is to me, is a photo of the Wear-Ever 
9x9 pan that she made the cake in even before I was born (and I'll be 70 in March).  What a thrill for me 
to be able to pass this sentiment down to my 3 daughters.  Thank you again for providing this recipe.  
You can only imagine how nice it feels to remember my mom who's been gone for 54 years.

Warm regards,

Kit
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Phaed,

Last night I made the Chocolate Mayonnaise Cake that you suggested and used Hellmann's mayonnaise like my mom did
so many years ago. I frosted it like she did and it tasted just like hers. It's apparently the same recipe she used.

Thanks for your help.  I appreciate it and hope my daughters do, too.

Regards,

Kit


Shaker Chicken Soup

From: "Donna" 
To: "Phaedrus" 
Subject: Shaker Chicken Noodle soup
Date: Thursday, January 02, 2014 11:06 AM

Winter weather=soup.  This recipe was given to me by a friend and it is outstanding.  

Don't know why it is called Shaker?  Is this a type/style of noodle?  Is it what some folks refer to as a 
'dumpling' in the shape of noodle?  It makes a large amount and freezes well for a short while.  Enjoy.

Shaker Chicken and Noodle Soup
Yield: 15 cups
Source: 365 Favorite
Brand Name Pasta Recipes
 
13 cups chicken broth, divided 
1/4 cup dry vermouth [can substitute sherry…but not cooking sherry as it is too salty]
1/4 cup butter or margarine 
1 cup heavy cream
1 package (12 ounces)frozen or dry egg noodles
1 cup thinly sliced celery 
1 1/2 cups water 
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups diced cooked chicken 
Salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley (optional)
 
NOTE:when you cook the chicken breasts in water…poaching…you create many cups of broth that can be
used in the soup in place of canned broth.  I find I need about half the amount of broth from cans 
[i.e. about 4 cans]
 
1.  Combine 1 cup broth, vermouth and butter in small saucepan. You must stay with the pan on this step.  
This reduction takes a bit of time but once it starts it goes quickly and can burn or boil dry. But this 
concentration of flavors is what makes the soup!!  Bring to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced to 
1/4 cup and has a syrupy consistency.   Stir in cream; set aside.
2.  Bring remaining broth to a boil in Dutch oven.  Add noodles and celery and cook until just tender.
3.  Combine water and flour in medium bowl until smooth.  Stir into broth mixture.  Boil for 2 minutes, 
stirring constantly.
4.  Stir in reserved cream mixture; add chicken.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Heat just to 
serving temperature.  Do not boil. Sprinkle with parsley.  Garnish as desired.  
=======================================================================
Hey Phaed:
 
The use of the word shaker in this recipe refers to it's origin, "The Shakers", and the style of cooking. 
A Shaker Maxim: ''Simple, wholesome, basic food, well prepared, and a lot of it. We have always tried to 
use the best ingredients, just because it would be a waste of time not to.''
 
Timm in Oregon

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