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2008

TODAY's CASES:

Savory Salt

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Mary 
  To: phaedrus
  Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2008 12:14 PM
  Subject: Savory Salt

  Hi Phaedrus,

  On November 19, 2007 I see in your mail a man requesting information on Savory Salt, I went 
to the website you suggested and it was not there.  My mother swears that it was made by Lowry's, 
I remember it having a blue lid.  I have goggled it and attempted several different searches to 
no avail. I would be thrilled to make it or purchase it.  Sorry if this seems redundant.  

  Thank you,

  Mary

Hello Mary,

I think you mean the e-mail from November 19, 2002 about savory salt, at: http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m122702.htm#4

Yes, at some point in the last five years, the "Marimann" website went off the Internet. If you'll read that e-mail closely, though, you'll note that I was directing Derek to a site for the type of "savory salt" used for making venison jerky, not the kind that Lawry's made. There are two kinds of "savory salt", as I explained to Derek. The kind that Lawry's sold was a mixture of herbs to be used as a salt substitute. Yes, they stopped making it several years ago. There is a recipe for a "savory salt substitute" below, and this company advertises one for sale:
Myacamas

Phaed

  Savory Salt Substitute
   
   Recipe By     : Reader's Digest Great Recipes for Good Health
   Serving Size  : 1    Preparation Time :0:00
   Categories    : 
     Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
   --------  ------------  --------------------------------
      1      tablespoon    black pepper
      1      tablespoon    celery seeds
      1      tablespoon    onion powder
      2 1/4  teaspoons     cream of tartar
      1 1/2  teaspoons     garlic powder
      1 1/2  teaspoons     powdered orange peel
      1 1/2  teaspoons     arrowroot
      1 1/2  teaspoons     sugar
        3/4  teaspoon      sour salt (powdered citric acid)
        1/2  teaspoon      white pepper
        1/2  teaspoon      dill weed
        1/2  teaspoon      dried thyme -- crumbled
        1/4  teaspoon      plus a pinch of powdered lemon peel
        1/4  teaspoon      cayenne pepper
   
   Place all the ingredients in a small electric coffee grinder, spice
   grinder or blender.  Grind for 10 seconds or until the mixture is fine.
   Insert a funnel in the top of a a glass salt shaker, pour the mixture
   into it and tap the funnel lightly to fill the shaker.  Cover the rest of
   the mixture tightly and store it in a cool, dark, dry place.  makes about 1/2
   cup.

Grape Leaves

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Sue 
  To: phaedrus
  Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2008 6:07 PM
  Subject: grape leaves

  I love stuffed grape leaves.   I have grape vines in my yard with beautiful leaves.  Can I use 
  these leaves and is there anything I need to do before to prepare them?

  Sue
 

Hi Sue,

You want to be absolutely sure that no pesticides or other chemicals have been sprayed on them. You want to use medium-sized leaves - the big ones are too tough and the small ones are too thin. You want to blanch them before using or freezing them. See here for detailed instructions:
Dolmas

Phaed


Dupar's Blueberry Pie

----- Original Message ----- 
From: debbie
To: phaedrus
Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 4:37 AM
Subject: Dupars Blueberry cream cheese pie

> Dear Phaedrus,
>
> I have searched everywhere for a recipe for the Dupars Blueberry Cream 
> Cheese Pie, something I remember from my childhood as being a special 
> treat when we would go there.  Although I have seen many recipes for 
> various cream cheese pies, none of them appear to approach the soft 
> texture of the pie that they serve in the restaurant. Please help.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Debbie

Hello Debbie,

There is no recipe by that name on the Internet. See below for what I did find.

Phaed

Sour Cream Blueberry Pie

1 (8 oz.) carton sour cream
2 tbsp. flour
3/4 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 egg
1 dry pt. fresh blueberries
3 tbsp. flour
1 graham cracker crust

Rinse and pull off stems of blueberries. Let blueberries drain in a 
colander. Mix first 5 ingredients on medium speed of an electric mixer for 
exactly 5 minutes.

Gently stir in the blueberries into the custard mixture. Pour into the pie 
crust. Bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes.

Refrigerate. Serve cold.

"This pretty much replicates the Blessed Dupar's Blueberry Sour Cream Pie of 
Ages Past."

Onion Glass

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: eugene 
  To: phaedrus 
  Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 1:07 AM
  Subject: Onion Glass

  Hie Uncle Phaed,

  Can you help me find the recipe for Onion Glass by Alexander Talbot?

  Thank You very much!!!

  Eugene

Hello Eugene,

Yes, it is here:

Onion Glass

Phaed


Horseshoe Casino Bread Pudding

From: DIANA
To: "Phaedrus" 
Subject: Recipe you might want
Date: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 6:58 AM

Hello, Friend:

I can never remember if you read the Memphis Commercial Appeal or not, so here's a recipe from 
today's issue of "Recipe Finder." Thought you might like to share it.

Hope yall aren't getting soaked with rain like we are here in Northeast Arkansas; I believe my 
feet will begin to web at any time!

Take care,

diana

Horseshoe Casino Bread Pudding

2 1/4 cups sugar
2 qts. whole milk
13 large eggs
1 qt. plus 3/4 cup half-and-half
1 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
Cinnamon, to taste
12 to 16 cups bread cubes

Mix all ingredients except bread together until incorporated. Pour over cubed bread of choice and 
let soak for at least half an hour. Then bake at 300 degrees in a water bath until firm. (The length 
of time will depend on the type of pan or cup you are using.) Let cool for at least a few hours in 
the refrigerator. This will let the custard set. You can reheat afterward if you'd like.

Makes enough to fill two 9-by 13-inch pans. Use whatever combination of pans you can to accommodate
the water bath; just be sure to fill your pan just a little over the rim with the bread.

Note: Cooking in a water bath means to place the container of food in a larger, shallow container 
of warm water. This keeps delicate dishes like custards from breaking or curdling.

Source: Maurice McMillan, executive pastry chef, Horseshoe Casino (Tunica, Mississippi)


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