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2001

TODAY's CASES:

Giant Fried Olives?

----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Guy 
  To: phaedrus 
  Sent: Friday, September 21, 2001 6:46 AM
  Subject: pork

  I read a recipie for fried olives last night that said chop
  mortadella,prosciutto,and pork,along with a egg and stuff for 
  the filling.It used 3 times more pork.What would you suggest 
  for the type of pork to use?
  Isn't it terrible about New York.I don't know where you are,but 
  around here,there seems to be a dark shadow over us.
  Take care,
  Guy

Hi Guy,

Below is the recipe that I have for fried olives (Olives all'ascolana). it, too calls for pork, although ground beef may be used.
I think I would use tender pork steak. Pork tenderloin is tempting, and if your recipe calles for pancetta or bacon as the one below, I might try the tenderloin. Without added fat, though, the tenderloin might be too dry. I might also be tempted to experiment at least once by using ground pork. First choice would be pork steak.

We are as far from New York as you, but the events of September 11 have cast a pall over everything here as well. It was an awful thing. I hope President Bush can make good on his promise to root out those responsible and bring them to justice.

Phaed

  Olives all'ascolana 
  (Fried Olives)

  These may be stuffed in various ways-with leftover roast chicken 
  mixed with cooked ham or prosciutto, with beef or pork, with chicken 
  livers, or with anchovies preserved in oil. They can also be served 
  as an accompaniment to meat dishes.

  Ingredients

  3 oz pork
  2 oz sliced pancetta or rindless bacon
  salt and freshly ground pepper
  1 cup dry white wine (optional use olive oil)
  1/4 cup coarsely torn fresh bread (no crust)
  1 egg yolk
  2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan
  pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
  24 giant green olives, drained
  1 egg
  1/2 cup all purpose flour
  1 cup fine dry breadcrumbs
  4 cups oil for deep frying
   Cut the pork into small pieces. Saute the bacon in a skillet until 
   it begins to color. Add the pork and a little salt and pepper and 
   cook until golden. Add the wine, lower the heat and simmer gently 
   for about 1 hour, adding a little water if necessary to keep the 
   mixture moist.

  Drain off the liquid and chop the meats very finely. Soak the fresh 
  bread in water and squeeze dry. Add bread to the meat with the egg yolk,
  Parmesan and nutmeg. Pit the olives with and olive pitter and fill them 
  with the prepared mixture, using a pastry bag fitted with a small round 
  tip. Beat the whole egg with a pinch of salt in a deep dish. Roll the 
  olives in flour, then in the egg, and then in dry breadcrumbs. Heat the 
  oil in a deep skillet and fry the olives in it until golden. Drain on 
  paper towels and serve very hot.

  Serves 6.
   

Glissantes: French Canadian Dumplings

----- Original Message -----
From: ROLLY
To: phaedrus
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2001 11:45 AM
Subject: Glissantes

> I have heard of this french Canadian dish,but know nothing of it.It is
> apparently a pastry of some sort fried in the drippings after cooking a
> roast or the like.Can you help.Thanks,rolly

Hi Rolly,

Well, glissantes are sort of like dumplings. It's basically a spoonful of dough that is cooked by boiling it in chicken broth or beef broth. Sometimes the dough is boiled in plain water, then served with syrup or jam as a sweet.

Below are two recipes from About.com's French Canadian Culture site. The dish has been updated a bit in that the dough squares are covered with the boiling liquid and then baked, rather than just being cooked in a pot of boiling broth or water.

The pastry is actually baked in consommé or tomato soup in the first recipe, which is a meat recipe.

The second one is a dessert glissante served with jam. In this one, the pastry is baked in apple juice.

This dish sounds pretty tasty.

Phaed

--------------------------------------
Glissantes à la viande

2 cups all purpose flour
4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1 T. butter or melted fat
Meat mixture (below)
2 cups consommé or 1 can of tomato soup and 1 1/2 cups water


1. Sift together flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl.
2. In another bowl, beat together eggs and milk. Pour all at once into dry
ingredients. Mix vigorously. Add melted butter or fat.
3. Place dough on floured surface. Roll until 1/4 inch thick. Cut into 1x1
inch squares.
4. Butter baking pan. Place pastry squares in pan. Spread meat mixture on
each square and repeat by placing another row of pastry on the first and
covering it with more meat mixture.
5. Heat consommé to boiling. Pour over the pastry. Cover and bake at 350° F
for 50 to 60 minutes. For a browner and more crusty pastry, do not cover
while baking.

Meat Mixture: Fry onions to taste, add an equal amount of chopped cooked
meat (ground beef, chicken, etc.) Season with a bit of savory. Add salt and
pepper to taste.

Translated from Mme Jehane Benoit's L'Encyclopédie de la Cuisine Canadienne
-------------------------------------------------
Glissantes à la Confiture

2 cups all purpose flour
4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1 T. butter or melted fat
jam to taste
2 cups apple juice

1. Sift together flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl.
2. In another bowl, beat together eggs and milk. Pour all at once into dry
ingredients. Mix vigorously. Add melted butter or fat.
3. Place dough on floured surface. Roll until 1/4 inch thick. Cut into 1x1
inch squares.
4. Butter baking pan. Place pastry squares in pan. Spread jam on each square
and repeat by placing another row of pastry on the first and covering it
with more jam.
5. Heat apple juice to boiling. Pour boiling juice over the pastry. Cover
and bake at 350° F for 50 to 60 minutes. For a browner and more crusty
pastry, do not cover while baking.

Translated from Mme Jehane Benoit's L'Encyclopédie de la Cuisine Canadienne

Storing Peanuts

----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Lance 
  To: phaedrus 
  Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2001 5:06 PM
  Subject: Storing fresh (raw and undried) peanuts in brine

  Can raw peanits be stored(for up to a year) in either an 
  ambient temperature or a chilled brine? The reason to do 
  this will be to use for boiling all year long. Thanks, LAnce
  

Hi Lance,

Everything that I can find points to two requirements for storing peanuts: cool and dry. Warmth and humidity encourage the growth of several molds, some of them toxic, such as aspergillus.

One place suggested storing them in airtight containers in the freezer. That sounds pretty good to me. I don't know about the brine. That might prevent mold, but it also might degrade flavor and texture of the peanuts.

My choice would be airtight containers in the freezer. If that's not practical, then I'd find a very cool (below 70° F), very dry place and monitor them closely for mold growth.

You might also think about boiling them first, then freezing them. Several sources said that freezing boiled peanuts doesn't affect the flavor.

Phaed


Hungarian Food

----- Original Message ----- 
  From: liz
  To: phaedrus 
  Sent: Friday, September 21, 2001 8:07 PM

  Can't seem to locate an online company specializing in Hungarian 
  merchandise or prepared foods.  Please help!!!!!!!
  Liz
  

Hi Liz,

No problem. Try these sites:

http://www.hungariandeli.com/
Otto's European and Hungarian Import Store & Deli

http://www.ahfoundation.org/shop/food.htm
MUSEUM SHOP
American Hungarian Foundation
Hungarian Heritage Center Museum
FOOD BASKETS / BOXES

http://www.magyarmarketing.com/order/index.html
Magyar Marketing

http://www.drotos.com/drotos/door/
Drotos Brothers Market http://www.urbancsalad.com/ahazkorul/webcook.htm
A great Hungarian page

Phaed


Cannoli

----- Original Message ----- 
  From: FT
  To: phaedrus 
  Sent: Monday, September 24, 2001 8:28 PM
  Subject: Cannolis

  I'm looking for any history on the cannoli. 
  Was it served at special times? 
  Does it have any significance? 
  Any info you can give me would be great thanks. 
  

Hi,

Well, let's see:

"Cannoli" literally means "tubes." These pastries are little fried dough tubes filled with sweetened ricotta cheese and other fillings. Originally, the pastry was flavored with wine, and in Sicily this is still done.

Modern cannoli originated in Sicily. They go back at least to the first millenium when Italy was under Arab (Saracen) rule. Cannoli may, in fact, have originally been an Arabic dish. They are sometimes called "Turkish hats." Some authorities believe they go back even further than that.

Cannoli were traditionally served at carnival time ("carnevale"), but are now served anytime..

Here are a couple of links with cannoli info:

http://www.ilgelato.net/numero12/i-sp-pas.htm

http://www.chefwalter.com/gstronomy.htm

Phaed

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