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2006

TODAY's CASES:

Butter Pie

On 13 Dec 2006 at 18:18, ann wrote:

> Boy am I glad I found this site.  My Great Grand Mother, who lived to
> be 106, grew up on a farm in Hazen Arkansas, then moved to Oklahoma
> once widowed.  She used to make a melt in your mouth pie simply called
> "Butter Pie"  It was criss crossed dough in layers, with some type of
> filling between the layers.  During the cooking process, the criss
> crossed dough and filling would become one so that you couldn't tell
> where one ended and the other began. I know I'm rattling here, and I
> apologize, but I have looked and looked for this recipe to no avail. 
> Please help.
> 
> Best regards,
> 
> Ann
> 

Hello Ann,

If it had multiple layers, it sounds more like a cobbler of some sort than a pie.

I can't find a recipe for a "butter cobbler", nor can I find a recipe for a "butter pie" with multiple layers like that. However, other than the multiple layers, the below recipe seems very close to what you describe. Give it a try and see if it tastes familiar.

Phaed

Butter Pie

1 cup sugar
2 1/4 cups cream
3 tbsp flour
Butter, size of large egg

Cover pie plate with pie crust.  Mix butter, flour and sugar together and stir 
in cream.  Pour into pie plate and lay strips of pie crust across in lattice 
work.  Bake until thick and brown in a 350 degree oven.

Recipe from Cecil Calden 
His note:  This recipe is over 100 years old.

Source:Coos County Farm Cookbook (The Coos County Farm is a nursing home. All
 the residents are a wonderful source for old and heirloom recipes.)

From Scratch?

On 15 Dec 2006 at 10:00, sherri wrote:

> Dear Phaedrus:
>
> Do you happen to know where the term "made from scratch" came from?
> I mean what exactly is "scratch"?
> 
> Thanks in advance for your help.
> 
> Sincerely,
> Sherri

Hi Sherri,

"Start from Scratch" is an old phrase from sporting events. The "scratch" is both the starting line in a foot race, and a line drawn between the two boxers in a boxing match which neither fighter is supposed to cross before the bell rings. In sports, "starting from scratch" thus means starting from the beginning, with no extra advantage. In cooking, too, it means starting from basic ingredients, with no advantages such as cake mixes, etc.

Phaed


Pineapple Crisp

On 14 Dec 2006 at 13:14, Kethy wrote:

> Hello,
> 
> I have been looking for years for a recipe for what my school
> Cafeteria called "Pineapple Crisp". It is a dessert dish and was
> served warm.
> 
> I know it had:
> 
> Pineapple
> oatmeal
> sugar
> maybe butter
> maybe some spices, but not anything strong.
> 
> I have seen apple crisp recipes, but never the pineapple crisp.
> 
> Thank for any help you can give.
> 
> Kathy

Hi Kathy,

See below.

Phaed

Pineapple  Crisp

2/3 c. non-fat dry milk
2 oz. quick oatmeal
1/4 c. brown sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 tsp. butter
1 c. crushed pineapple (no-sugar added variety)

 Mix all ingredients except pineapple and blend well with pastry fork. Place 1/2 
 of mixture in pan. Put in pineapple and top with remainder of mixture.  Bake at 
 350 degree for 20-25 minutes. 

Varskes Spurgos

On 16 Dec 2006 at 14:05, Vitale wrote:

> Dear Phaedrus,
> You gave the wrong recipe!!!
> There are 2 kinds of Spurgos in Lithuania. Yeast doughnuts and cottage
> cheese. They are absolutely different taste. I am lithuanian, and i
> was searching for this recipe in english. I think Bobbie needed
> another recipe... Unfortunately i can not find it in english. I have it
> only in lithuanian in my mom's recipe book.
> 
> Going to surf and continue my searches.... Besides...  Once you try
> cottage cheese spurgos, you will not want any yeast doughnuts :)
> 
> My best wishes,
> Vitale
> 

Hello Vitale,

Perhaps this is it. It seems to be a difficult translation. Can you help improve it?

Phaed

Doughnuts from curd (Varskes spurgos)

Ingredients
1/2 kg of curd
5 spoons of flour
4 spoons of sugar
2-3 eggs
50 g of butter
1 teaspoon of soda
vanilla sugar
sugar powder for dressing

Mix eggs, sugar, curd, (sour cream and soda must be mixed before) flour and 
vanilla sugar well. Then form not big round doughnuts and fry or even boil in 
the pot with oil till get light brown. Doughnuts are dressed with sugar powder.
(they are more delicious if the paste is softer).
-----------------------

Hello Vitale,

What about this recipe? It's been Westernized, but isn't it close?

Phaed

Cottage Cheese Doughnuts 

2-1/2 cups unbleached flour (sifted)
2 (15-ounce) (453 grams) low fat cottage cheese
4 eggs
1/3 cup canola oil
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons lemon rind
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup sugar
Powdered sugar for decoration
Flour for breading

In a bowl mix the flour, cottage cheese, eggs, oil, baking powder, lemon rind, 
salt and sugar. Mix well. Heat the oil until very hot. Make little round balls 
from the dough (about 1-inch. In diameter). Roll the little balls into the 
flour and fry until lightly brown. Drain on a paper towel. 
Sprinkle with powdered sugar. This recipe makes 15 doughnuts.

Note: These doughnuts are best eaten hot.

Tip: You can add cinnamon to the mixture before frying.
----------------------------------
Hello, Phaedrus,
Recipe of Doughnuts from curd (Varskes spurgos) is exactly what Bobbie
needed. We use fat curd - about 9 or even 18 % of fat. So there is no need
to add any oil.
And we always add the rind of lemon and a little bit of vanilla. Sometimes
we mix some raisins too - it depends on taste.
We never roll formed balls in the flour.

Thank you for your quick reply :)

Vitale


Conversion Tables

Dear Phaedrus,

I do a lot of recipe conversions/redactions, and I regularly use the 
following tables when I share recipes with folks overseas.  I'm including 
them here to help the folks who use your website.  There may be a bit of 
duplication. but I hope they prove useful.

Robin

LIQUID MEASUREMENTS
1 ounce = 2 tablespoons fat or liquid
1 cup = 8 fluid ounces
2 cups = 16 fluid ounces
4 cups = 32 fluid ounces
2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart
1 quart = 4 cups
4 quarts = 1 gallon

Measurements 
1 wineglass  1/4 cup 
1 jigger  1.5 fluid ounces 
1 gill  1/2 cup 
1 teacup  a scant 3/4 cup 
1 coffeecup  a scant cup 
1 tumbler  1 cup  
1 pint  2 cups 
1 quart  4 cups 
1 peck  2 gallons - dry 
1 pinch or dash  what can be picked up between thumb and first two fingers;
less than 1/8 teaspoon 
1/2 pinch  what can be picked up between thumb and one finger 
1 saltspoon  1/4 teaspoon 
1 kitchen spoon  1 teaspoon 
1 dessert spoon  2 teaspoons or 1 soupspoon 
1 spoonful  1 Tablespoon more or less 
1 saucer  1 heaping cup (about) 

Common Weights 
1 penny weight 1/20 ounce 
1 drachma 1/8 ounce 
60 drops thick fluid 1 teaspoon 

1 ounce equals: 
4-1/2 Tablespoons allspice, cinnamon, curry, paprika or dry mustard
or 4 Tablespoons cloves or prepared mustard 
or 3 1/2 Tablespoons nutmeg or pepper 
or 3 Tablespoons sage, cream of tartar or cornstarch
or 2 Tablespoons salt or any liquid 

1 pound equals: 
2 cups liquid 
or 4 cups flour 
or 8 medium size eggs with shells 
or 10 eggs without shells 
or 2 1/2 cups confectioner's sugar or packed brown sugar 
or 4 cups grated cabbage, cranberries, coffee or chopped celery 
or 3 cups corn meal 
or 2 cups uncooked rice 
or 2-3/4 cups raisins or dried currants 
2 cups butter or 4 sticks of butter
4 cups all-purpose flour 
2 cups granulated sugar 
3-1/2 cup powdered sugar, packed 
2-1/4 cups brown sugar, packed

Butter the size of an egg  1/4 cup or 2 ounces 
Butter the size of a walnut  1 Tablespoon 
Butter the size of a hazelnut  1 teaspoon 

NOTE:  All metric equivalents are approximate; they have been rounded
 to the nearest metric equivalent for ease of use.

APPROXIMATE METRIC EQUIVALENTS FOR VOLUME 
U.S.Volume ......................Metric Measure Equivalent 
1/8 t................................0.5 milliliter
1/4 t..................................1 milliliter
1/2 t..................................2 milliliters
1 t....................................5 milliliters
1/2 T..................................7 milliliters
1 T (3 teaspoons).....................15 milliliters
2 T (1 fluid ounce)...................30 milliliters
1/4 c (4 tablespoons).................60 milliliters
1/3 c.................................80 milliliters 
1/2 c (4 fluid ounces)...............125 milliliters
2/3 c................................160 milliliters
3/4 c (6 fluid ounces)...............180 milliliters
1 c (16 tablespoons).................250 milliliters
1 pt (2 cups)........................500 milliliters 
1 qt (4 cups)..........................1 Liter

Temperatures 
Oven Temperatures      C     F     Gas Mark 
Very slow                   120    250       1/2 
Slow                          150     300        2 
Mod. Slow                  160     315        3 
Moderate                    180     350        4 
Mod. Hot                    190     375         5-6 
Hot                            210     415         6-7 
Very Hot                    230     450 or over         8-9 

 APPROXIMATE METRIC EQUIVALENTS FOR TEMPERATURES
 Degrees...................................Degrees
 Fahrenheit................................Celsius
 200 F.....................................100 C 
 250 F.....................................120 C 
 275 F.....................................140 C 
 300 F.....................................150 C 
 325 F.....................................160 C 
 350 F.....................................180 C
 375 F.....................................190 C
 400 F.....................................200 C 
 425 F.....................................220 C 
 450 F.....................................230 C

 APPROXIMATE METRIC EQUIVALENTS FOR WEIGHT U.S.
 Weight..............................Metric
 Measure................................Equivalent
 1/2 ounce..............................15 grams
 1 ounce................................30 grams
 2 ounces...............................60 grams
 3 ounces...............................85 grams
 1/4 lb (4 ounces).....................115 grams
 1/2 lb (8 ounces).....................225 grams
 3/4 lb (12 ounces)....................340 grams
 1 lb (16 ounces)......................450 grams

 APPROXIMATE METRIC EQUIVALENTS FOR DIMENSIONS
 U.S.....................................Metric
 Dimension.............................Equivalent
 1/16 inch.......................... 2 millimeters
 1/8 inch........................... 3 millimeters
 3/16 inch.......................... 5 millimeters
 1/4 inch........................... 6 millimeters
 3/8 inch........................... 9 millimeters
 1/2 inch...........................1.3 centimeters
 3/4 inch...........................1.9 centimeters
 1 inch.............................2.5 centimeters
 1 1/2 inches.........................4 centimeters
 2 inches.............................5 centimeters
 3 inches.............................8 centimeters
 4 inches............................10 centimeters
 5 inches............................13 centimeters
 9 inches............................23 centimeters
 11 inches...........................28 centimeters
 13 inches...........................33 centimeters

 BRITISH IMPERIAL EQUIVALENTS FOR U.S. VOLUME MEASURES U.S.
 Volume.............................Imperial
 Measure................................Equivalent
 1 fluid ounce..........................1.04 fluid ounces
 1 pint.................................... 0.83 pint
 1 quart.............................. ....0.83 quart
 1 gallon............................. ...0.83 gallon

DRY MEASUREMENTS
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup
5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup
8 tablespoons= 1/2 cup
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
2 tablespoons = 1 ounce
4 ounces = 1/4 pound
8 ounces = 1 cup
16 ounces - 1 pound
1 pound = 454 grams

One Cup of Fine Crumbs Measurements
28 saltine crackers
4 slices of bread
14 square graham crackers
22 vanilla wafers

Other Measurements Used in Recipes
Pinch = as much as can be taken between tip of finger and thumb
Speck = less than 1/8 teaspoon
1 lemon makes 2 tablespoons of juice
1 orange makes 1/3 cup of juice
8 to 10 egg whites = 1 cup
12 to 14 egg yolks = 1 cup
1 cup unwhipped cream = 2 cups whipped
4 ounces of uncooked macaroni = 2 1/4 cup cooked
7 ounces spaghetti = 4 cups cooked
4 ounces uncooked noodles = 2 cups cooked
1 pound unshelled almonds = 3/4 to 1 cup shelled almonds

METRIC MEASUREMENTS
1 teaspoon = 5 milliliters
1 tablespoons = 15 milliliters
1 cup = 240 milliliters
1 ounce = 28 grams
1 pound = 454 grams
1/4 teaspoon 1.25 ml 
1/2 teaspoon 2.5 ml 
3/4 teaspoon 3.75 ml 
1 teaspoon 5 ml 
1 tablespoon 15 ml 
1/4 cup 62.5 ml 
1/2 cup 125 ml 

3/4 cup 187.5 ml 
1 cup 250 ml 
1 ounce 28.4 g 
8 ounces 227.5 g 
16 ounces (1 pound) 455 g 
Weight to volume approximations of common recipe ingredients: 

1/4 lb stick of butter = 1/2 cup or 8 tablespoons
1 ounce by weight of butter = 2 tablespoons
1 lb of cornstarch = 3 cups
1 ounce by weight of cornstarch = 1.5 fluid ounces
1 lb of flour (regular) = 3 cups sifted
1 ounce by weight flour (regular) = 1.5 fluid ounces
1 lb of flour, cake = 4 3/4 cups sifted
1 ounce by weight flour, cake = 2 1/3 fluid ounces
1 lb of sugar, granulated = 2 cups
1 ounce by weight sugar, granulated = 1 fluid ounce
1 lb of sugar, powdered = 3 3/4 cups unsifted; 4 1/2 cups sifted
1 ounce by weight sugar, powdered = slightly less than 2 fluid ounces unsifted
1 ounce by weight sugar, powdered = 2 1/4 fluid ounces sifted 

Here are some more common approximations: 

1 Tablespoon flour = 1/3 oz by weight
1 oz by weight of flour = 3 Tablespoons
1 cup flour = 5.3 oz by weight
1 oz by weight flour = 1/5 cup
1 teaspoon sugar = 1/6 oz by weight
1 Tablespoon sugar = 1/2 oz by weight
1 oz by weight sugar = 2 Tablespoons
1 cup sugar = 8 oz by weight

--------------------------------------

Metric to U.S.: 

Volume:
10 milliliters = approximately 2 teaspoons
236.59 milliliters = 1 cup 

Weight:
28.35 grams = 1 ounce by weight
10 grams = approx. 1/3 ounce
1 kilogram = 2.2 lbs 

Volume:
1 teaspoon = 4.93 milliliters
1 tablespoon = 14.79 milliliters
1 fluid ounce = 29.57 milliliters
1 cup = 236.59 milliliters 

Weight: 1 ounce by weight = 28.35 grams
1 pound = .454 kilograms or 454 grams 

So, 

10 grams of butter = about 1/3 ounce by weight = 1/3 fluid ounce by volume = 
2 teaspoons
10 grams of cornstarch = about 1/3 ounce by weight = 1/2 fluid ounce by 
volume = 1 tablespoon
10 grams of flour = about 1/3 ounce by weight = 1/2 fluid ounce by volume =1 
tablespoon
10 grams of granulated sugar about 1/3 ounce by weight = 1/3 fluid ounce by 
volume = 2 teaspoons
10 grams of powdered sugar about 1/3 ounce by weight = 2/3 fluid ounces by 
volume = 4 teaspoons 

and (U.S. to metric) 

1 stick of butter = 1/2 cup = 1/4 lb = 4 ounces by weight = 113.4 grams
1 tablespoon of butter = 1/2 fluid ounces = 1/2 ounce by weight = 14.2 grams
1 tablespoon of cornstarch = 1/2 fluid ounce = 1/3 ounce by weight = 9.7 grams
1 cup of flour = 8 fluid ounces = 1/3 lb = 5.3 ounces by weight = 151 grams
1 cup of sugar = 8 fluid ounces = 1/2 lb = 8 ounces by weight = 226.4 grams
1 cup of powdered sugar = 8 fluid ounces = 4 ounces by weight = 113.4 grams 

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